Dredge (and Rainey) Report Cell 5 to Marsh Level

Friday, November 4

Figure 19. Waves of ducks and geese crossed the pre-dawn sky.

Figure 19. Waves of ducks and geese crossed the pre-dawn sky.

As the sky began to lighten, flocks of ducks and geese came in waves across the marsh. The first geese of the season had arrived following the recent front. Everywhere you looked along the horizon there were moving flocks of birds.We could hear them calling, or could hear the sound of their wings as they rowed past in the crisp morning air. I hated to leave.
I had agreed to bring the Avocet for a National Wildlife Federation flotilla to Wax Lake Delta, and had to leave the camp at 7:30am. The water level was still at a low, low tide, leaving all three boats grounded in the boatshed. Timmy had to pull my boat out by pushing against the Goose to get it to the canal where I could load it. I had to take the long way around to stay in deep enough water; which was a peaceful cruise along Belle Island Bayou until I reached Freshwater Bayou, where I had to gun it through the shallow mouth of the bayou across standing waves coming out of FW Bayou.

Figure 20. All three boats were grounded in the boatshed with the low water.

Figure 20. All three boats were grounded in the boatshed with the low water.

The rest of the trip was easy; fuel up at Shell Morgan, load the boat on the trailer at the public ramp, catch breakfast in Abbeville, and launch the boat at Burns Pt for an 11:00 am busload of people. It turned out to be another amazing day in the Louisiana wetlands!

Figure 21. I was part of the NWF flotilla to the Wax Lake Delta. David Muth is standing on the new land at the western edge of the subaerial portion of the delta.

Figure 21. I was part of the NWF flotilla to the Wax Lake Delta. David Muth is standing on the new land at the western edge of the subaerial portion of the delta.

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