May 03, 2013 – Pumphouse and another small dredge

Dredge and Rainey Report
Pumphouse and another small dredge

May 03, 2013

Summary of accomplishments:

  • Moved water pump into elevated pump house
  • Visited another small dredge

Impediments: extreme low water in pond

This report can be downloaded in PDF file format by clicking the Dredge and Rainey Report, Pumphouse and another small dredge hyperlink.

Summary:
Low water pattern dominated, discouraging dredging. The dredge is at the limit of the hose length in the canal, and any dredging would require moving the dredge hose and the dredge. Low water in the pond makes moving the hose very difficult, and the dredge would need to be moved back to the south side of the canal to be out of the way of passing traffic to the Coles Bayou project area.

May 1-2, 2013 – Moving the water pump

Timmy had decided that this week would be right for moving the water pump into the elevated pump house he had constructed. I made it out to the camp Tuesday evening so that we could get started early on Wednesday. To move the water pump and all of its associated equipment and tanks into the new pump house required shutting off the water to the headquarters. Once the pipes were cut, we were committed to completing the project today or there would be no water for showers later.

Figure 1. Beautiful start to a long work day.

Figure 1. Beautiful start to a long work day.

First, Timmy built the framework inside the pump house that would hold the equipment. We filled up as many containers as we could find with water before shutting it off. He disassembled the plumbing and I started digging the trench for the new line to and from the water well and pump house. During our many water breaks, we enjoyed the company of a Bay-breasted Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Orchard Orioles, hummingbirds and other birds that were foraging in the spring growth of the live oak trees around us.

Figure 2. All of the tanks and equipment on the left would be moved into the little house on the right, hopefully above any future storm surge.

Figure 2. All of the tanks and equipment on the left would be moved into the little house on the right, hopefully above any future storm surge.

Figure 3. Bay-breasted Warbler eating lunch in the oak tree (left) and Savannah Sparrow looking for his in the grass (right).

We moved the pump first and ran the incoming water line from the water well. Then the big tank had to be drained and rolled off its platform so the two of us could wrestle it up the steps. The water softener tank was even heavier, and ended up on my big toe before it was put into place. As we were laying out the parts to assemble the outgoing water line, we came up short. I hopped into the flat boat with a list in hand to make the run to my car and to Abbeville for the missing pieces. I wanted to make sure I got my shower tonight! When I got back, Timmy had finished all of the connections in the pumphouse and dug the rest of the trench for the new waterline toward the apartment and house. It didn’t take long to finish the job. By dark, the glue had set and Timmy pressured up the system with success. Shower!

On Thursday, while Timmy was out doing other sanctuary maintenance, Karen worked on crown molding and other trim in the apartment. I couldn’t finish because we have to pull paneling off to run electricity and cut a hole for the AC unit later.

Friday, May 3, 2013 – visit to DSC Dredge LLC

On Friday morning, Doug and Karen met in Reserve, LA to visit with Bob Wetta at DSC Dredge, a Dredging Supply Company that builds portable dredges. We had a very informative discussion about the services that DSC provides and the different types of dredges they design and construct. We were shown photos of various dredges and where/how they are being utilized around the world, we were given a tour of several vessels under construction, and visited the design building where several projects were underway and could be viewed and manipulated in 3D.

Bob provided a packet of information, including details on the smallest of the dredge classes, the “Moray,” so that I could continue to build a comparison table on dredging capacity and suitability for small-scale marsh creation. I borrowed the following photograph from their website since the Moray on the yard wasn’t complete.

Figure 4. The "Moray" swinging ladder dredge (photo from the DSC website).

Figure 4. The "Moray" swinging ladder dredge (photo from the DSC website).

The Moray is 43 ft long and 12 ft wide for transportation. The deck at the front swings open to 18.5 ft during operation to allow the cutterhead and submersible pump to swing from side to side. Three spuds are available to hold it in place, or it can rotate on the back one by using side cables. The rear spud can also be rotated to use as a kicker to move the dredge forward. It has an enclosed cabin and is operated by one person. It draws 3 feet and weighs 43,000 lbs. It can pump up to 450 cy/hour through an 8 inch hose (23x more than ours!). Cost is roughly $½ Million ($1.3M for the Amphibex discussed March 5).

Figure 5. Doug and Bob on the stern of the Moray (left) and looking through the cabin to the front of the Moray (right).

Figure 5. Doug and Bob on the stern of the Moray (left) and looking through the cabin to the front of the Moray (right).

Bob Wetta, President
DSC Dredge LLC
156 Airport Road
Reserve, LA 70084
RBWetta@dscdredge.com
www.dscdredge.com
(985) 479-1355

Karen A Westphal and Timmy J Vincent, National Audubon Society
Louisiana Coastal Initiative and the Paul J Rainey Wildlife Refuge
6160 Perkins Road, Suite 215, Baton Rouge, LA 70808
225-768-0921x202 office, kwestphal@audubon.org
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